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  • NoHo Summer Nights Festival

  • Stepping Up to Fix Sidewalks

  • Working Together for a Clean Energy Future

  • Moving the Valley Forward on Transportation

  • Making Our Valley Beautiful

  • Lending a Hand to People in Need

  • Creating Jobs for Angelenos

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Four_Pillers_in_One.jpgWelcome to your online portal with resources and updates about Los Angeles City Council District 2.

I'm a third generation San Fernando Valley resident and have spent my entire adult life advocating for community empowerment and good government. My top priorities are bringing continued progress, prosperity, mobility and sustainability to our Valley. Please use this website, sign up for my newsletter and contact my offices if you need assistance. My staff and I will always go the extra mile to serve you.

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PAUL KREKORIAN
Councilmember, Second District

  • Latest from the blog

    Get Ready for NoHo Summer Nights

    Summer is officially here and there are plenty of exciting things to look forward to in the East Valley. That's why we're excited to announce our partnership with the Valley Cultural Center and the Department of Cultural Affairs to bring a brand new outdoor event series to North Hollywood Park, NoHo Summer Nights. 
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    New Traffic Signal Makes Lankershim Safer for Pedestrians, Cyclists

    LOS ANGELES - Councilmember Krekorian and community members activated a brand new traffic signal and crosswalk at Lankershim Boulevard and Dundas Drive. The signal and the new crosswalk are vital safety improvements for this busy corridor that will protect pedestrians.
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  • Latest from the blog

    Update on the 170 Sound Walls

    For more than four decades, the neighborhoods of the San Fernando Valley adjacent to the 170 Freeway have been in desperate need of sound walls to minimize interference with their homes and lives.
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    Bringing Hope to Houston

    In the week since Hurricane Harvey made landfall in southeastern Texas, the tropical storm has a left trail of devastation in the region. So far, it has claimed nearly 50 lives, flooded 136,000 structures in Houston alone and displaced hundreds of thousands of people in the storm's wake. The rising waters turned familiar roads into rivers, and residents sought refuge in official and makeshift shelters.
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